internalized shadows

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Each of us wrestles with the dark giant in our own way. For some, doing shadow work may mean sacrificing niceness for honesty; it clearly means sacrificing ego appearances for the authenticity of the Self. For others, it may mean sacrificing grandiosity for humility; it clearly means sacrificing naive innocence for the promise of mature wisdom.

As each layer of shadow is mined from the darkness, as each fear is faced and each projection reclaimed, the gold shines through. And we begin to realize that the task is ongoing: The mine has no bottom floor. Yet, somehow, in a compassionate embrace of the dark side of reality, we become, like Lucifer, bearers of light. We open to the Other- the strange, the weak, the rejected, the unloved- and simply through including it, we transmute it. In so doing, we awaken to the larger life. WE sense patterns within patterns. We begin to hear the call of the Self. We no longer believe in magic, we rely on it.

~Connie Zweig

do not look away so quickly……

inquiry for today~   what is radical about lurking in your own shadows?

continually turning toward

Central to our integrity is “living by vow,” our ability to be guided by our deepest values, to be conscientious, and to connect to who we really are. Living by vow also points to our moral sensitivity, our capacity to identify morally relevant features in our interaction with others and in the organizations in which we work, and to have the insight and courage to deal with issues of harm.

What keeps us upright is our moral nerve, the courage to stand in principles of goodness. What keeps our integrity on track is our moral sensitivity. We need both a strong back and a soft front, lived equanimity and compassion, to keep us aligned with our values. We also need to have the kind of heart that is wide enough to accept rejection, criticism, disparagement, anger, and blame if our views are against the mainstream.

The most powerful vows are those that point us toward living a larger identity. of being Buddha. These vows support us in recognizing impermanence, interdependence, unselfishness, and compassion.

~Roshi Joan Halifax

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